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18 January 2011
Topic: Interviewing

Interview tips: Stage 4 - The Offer

Getting a new position can be some exciting stuff, and getting a new position that pays well with good benefits is just as exciting. So, how do you handle the offer stage of the interview process?

Depending on the company and the timing demand of getting someone in place, an offer can happen during any phase of the process. Normally, offers usually come at the last interview or shortly thereafter. As a rule of thumb, you want to always get it in writing. ; Don’t be afraid to ask questions to clarify any details, BUT at the same time, you don’t want to obsess about the minor ones…like, which holidays are paid holidays, etc…

One thing to keep in mind is that offers can and are often withdrawn. So it’s best to make a decision fairly quick. At the same time, don’t feel pressured to make an “on-the-spot” decision. It is okay to take time to research the offer.

So, what if you have multiple offers from different companies? There are definitely things to compare and contrast, such as who you will be working for, what you will be doing, and where you will be doing it. Say you fancy one position over the other, but the other has more along the lines of what you’re looking for benefit-wise or pay-wise; Don’t be afraid to share the facts on the offers you’ve had to get what you’re looking for. There’s nothing wrong with that. ; ; It’s always good to negotiate, but do it only once.

If you end up turning down a position, don’t rule it out completely - things always have a funny way of coming back around. It’s always good to leave the door open to offers you reject…remember, all positions can add some value to your resume, especially if you do good work.

At the end of the day, know what you’re looking for, but also understand that you may not get it all in one shot. ;

22 August 2011
Topic: Job Offers

Getting To The Acceptance - Negotiation Strategies



What is negotiation? Isn't it simply the discussion between people who are trying to reach an agreement? Then why does the word seem so intimidating and powerful? Possibly, it's because the term often represents situations where much is gained or lost? Or perhaps it is all the fancy books inside the local Borders that outline the newest negotiation tips and tricks? How can one digest all that info?

Here at Career Solutions, we think of negotiating as a simple process that should bring out excitement, not fear, not frustration…negotiation is the result of a successful interview process!

There is no book you can read to perfect the art of giving and taking the key to good negotiation is in having the proper perspective. Your perspective is always based on your intentions. If you are motivated to work for the company, you will find a way to reach an agreement and vice versa. Sometimes one party is more dedicated to reaching terms than the other and things won't work out, but the majority of the time when both parties are committed, the deal gets done and both parties are satisfied. Begin with the end in mind and don't go through the negotiations if you are not serious about accepting the job.

With this in mind, here are a couple of key points to remember on negotiating:

  • No two job negotiation experiences will be alike
  • There are many forces that impact your negotiating power
  • Unless this is an upper level position, there is usually only one opportunity to negotiate.
  • Face to face meetings are always the best format for nailing down the details
  • Make sure to know the 3 or 4 things you bring to the table why they need to hire you
  • Don't be afraid to ask questions this gives you information, information is critical to good communication
  • Honesty is critical… be up front with your needs, there is no need to be embarrassed about what you are worth
  • Don't be unreasonable in what you ask and check the ego at the door, ego's will always cost you money.
  • Always seek win/win…..if one side loses, nobody wins. Utilize a collaborative attitude.
  • Remember, how your counterpart handles the process speaks volumes about who they are.
  • Keep notes on the discussion and get the final agreement in writing.
  • If no agreement is reached, keep the door open should the other party reconsider.

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